Calabacitas

My wife Annie, from New Mexico, is one of the best cooks I know. Here are her thoughts on both summer and winter squash: My favorite way to use summer squash is some variation on the succotash to calabacitas continuum, brought to our tables by the intersection of Native American and European cuisine. These are sautéed, stewed, or even grilled; and include any combination of zucchini, yellow squash, onion, corn, Lima beans, tomato, green chile, meat, and cheese. My favorite, of course is my version of New Mexican calabacitas:
September 01, 2014

Ingredients

  • Sauté in olive oil
  • About 1 cup diced onion
  • About 4 cups sliced zucchini and yellow squash (I use my mandolin to slice quickly)
  • 1 clove diced garlic
Add
  • 1 cup corn (I like to cut my Iowa sweet corn straight off the cob)
  • Fresh chopped basil, salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

When these are beginning to brown, add and sauté a few more minutes:

1 to 4 New Mexico green chiles, roasted, skinned, and chopped (called Anaheim or Hatch in Midwestern grocery stores. We buy a bunch and roast and skin them and freeze them in small packages to last the year until next harvest.)

Add:

Serve with a little cheese. Some might choose grated Parmesan or feta, but traditionally it’s Monterey jack or Chihuahua.

This also works well cooked on the grill, and combines deliciously with grilled meat, or with a pinto-beans, fresh tortillas and Spanish rice dinner.

Winter Squash

We like winter squash roasted in the oven. 425 degrees F is a standard heat. Slice your squash in half, scoop out the seeds to be cleaned and toasted with olive oil and a little salt while you wait for dinner, and place the halves on a tin-foil covered baking sheet. You really want to protect your pan, because baked-on squash is devilishly hard to scrub off. You can fill the scooped out center with all kinds of things like a little butter, or butter and brown sugar, or a ragout of other autumn harvest vegetables like onion, tomato, pepper, and eggplant. This is really delicious with spaghetti squash. I love to use herbs like rosemary, summer savory and sage in these recipes. Of course, some squash stand on their own, especially butternut. We prefer our butternut to be unadulterated in all its smoky-smooth richness, and roast it without any seasoning or fillings and scoop it out as accompaniment to roast beef and a green salad. Ode to fall.

Ingredients

  • Sauté in olive oil
  • About 1 cup diced onion
  • About 4 cups sliced zucchini and yellow squash (I use my mandolin to slice quickly)
  • 1 clove diced garlic
Add
  • 1 cup corn (I like to cut my Iowa sweet corn straight off the cob)
  • Fresh chopped basil, salt and pepper to taste
Subscribe
Build your own subscription bundle.
Pick 3 regions for $60